Reb on the Web

 

 

GETTING YOUR HANDS DIRTY – TO SAY NOTHING OF YOUR FEET            

According to Life and Style magazine 21 year old pop star Ariana Grande, not only has business advisors, but a full-fledged entourage.  The Disney channel star turned R & B singer is apparently a demanding boss.  According to one source close to her – “Arianna’s new rule is that she is to be carried, literally like a baby, when she doesn’t feel like walking.  When she doesn’t feel like walking she doesn’t want her feet to hit the floor.”           

It’s easy for all of us to laugh at one more spoiled child star.  But the visual image of not having your feet touch the floor is too juicy an image to pass up.           

Are you kidding? The very definition of success in life is predicated upon our ability to figure out what to do when our feet hit the ground and when our faces have been smashed into the dirt.  Learning how to get our hands and feet dirty are the greatest teachers we can enjoy.         

One of the greatest stories in history is the story of Moses leading Israel out of Egyptian bondage.  But it all had to start somewhere.            

One day Moses comes upon a burning bush and encounters God.  “And God called to Moses out of the bush and said, do not come any closer. Remove your sandals from your feet.  This ground upon which you stand is holy.”  (Ex CH3)            

So there you have it.  The moment which will change his life teaches Moses that being a leader means getting your feet dirty.  Being a leader will mean that you will have to learn how to handle pressure and pain, adversity and anxiety.            

Moses is not given any entourage, so that his feet won’t hit the ground.  On the contrary.  When your feel the dust between your toes, you feel your mortality and you learn the importance of humility.            

This is a lesson that all child stars should learn.  Come to think of it, this is a lesson we must all learn.            

Never be afraid to get your hands and feet a bit dirty.  It’s the only way to grow and it’s the only way to find your path in life. 

Shalom,

Rabbi Ira Rothstein